Hummingbirds…

I am fascinated by hummingbirds.  hummingbird 1

They are truly amazing creatures.  Though so, so, tiny, they can seriously move across the air–when it’s mating season, they can fly up to sixty miles an hour!  “Normal” flight speeds are around thirty miles an hour, though.  There are seventeen species of hummingbirds (did you know that?).  Like I said, amazing!

Hummingbirds love bright colors.  That’s why most hummingbird feeders are red.  Sometimes that attraction to bright colors gets them in trouble–locked in a garage, falling out of a nest too soon, slamming into windows.  Yep, they are speedy, but can be a bit overly focused as well.

summer FI have a summer decoration hanging on my front door.  It has brightly colored flowers on it–cute I must say!  Anyway, I saw a hummingbird try to find nectar out of my fake flowers!  Oh, and while I’m outside writing this,  another hummingbird tried to put the moves on my decoration! 

Why do these crazy speedy creatures look for nectar in all the wrong places?

Singular focus, my friend.  If it looks like a flower, it must be a flower–in a hummingbird’s mind, that is.  While his focus may be narrow, his brain is impressive–4.2% of his body weight is brain, the largest proportion in the bird kingdom.  He is very smart; he can remember every flower he’s been to, and how long it will take that flower to refill in nectar (Thanks to World of Hummingbirds for all that info!).

So, even though my fake flowers are devoid of nectar, something keeps bringing those zippy flyers to my door.

Those flowers look like the real thing, but upon closer inspection, they prove not to have what the hummingbirds desire.

We humans are a lot like hummingbirds.  We can become singularly focused, to the detriment of all around us.  We can zip ,zip, zip through our days–and be worn out and without anything to show for it.  Though we are smart cookies, we can be deceived by things that look good, sound good, smell good.

We are often taken in by things that look like the “real thing,” but later turn out to not have what we need.

The apostle Paul knew all about that.  masqueradesListen to what he said in 2 Corinthians 11: 14–“…Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light.” Friend, our enemy knows our weaknesses.  If he can’t convince us in one way to do something contrary to the will of God, he will just find another way.  He will present options to us that look good, sound good–but aren’t good in the long run.

We are never immune to his assaults.

But, we don’t have to live in constant fear of being defeated by our enemy.  No, my sweet.  I challenge you to be more like a hummingbird.  Take the time to remember where you’ve been–think about how satan has convinced you before.  Put to memory any tactic he may have used to persuade you; remember, his goal is to make you less like Jesus.  In order to do that, he must make his options appear good, appear ‘bathed in light’ if you will.  Use that time of remembrance not to beat yourself up, for we all fall victim to satan’s ploys at times.  Instead, use the memories as ways to build up your attack.  Store those in your memory bank.  Don’t go back and visit the same “fake flower” over and over–start looking for the real thing.  For it is when we recognize satan’s tactics, and acknowledge that he has tricked us before, that we begin to have real victory over our enemy.

Stop visiting something that looks good, sounds good, but isn’t good.  Take your mind off it.  Step away from it.  Don’t go back to it.

Instead, focus on our Savior, the One True God.  He will more than sufficiently supply you with the much-needed “nectar” to get you through the day.

“…let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles (all the ways that we’ve been tricked by satan in the past). And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us,  fixing our eyes on Jesus (focusing on the real nectar), the Pioneer and Perfecter of faith.” (Hebrews 12: 1b-2a).

hummingbird 2

(Just a final picture of these amazing creatures–because I can!)

 

 

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